Commuting with a Laptop

Bicycle related chatter & discussion
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JoTheBuilder
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Postby JoTheBuilder » 20 Feb 2014, 13:21

Does anyone regularly commute with a laptop? If so, how do you carry it?
1. Backpack
2. Panniers
3. One shoulder thingy

Are there any recommendations for a backpack specifically (I can't/don't want to put panniers on my roadie)?

timothy_clifford
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Postby timothy_clifford » 20 Feb 2014, 13:55

I have a one shoulder thingy to cart my precious MacBook Pro.

It's a * . It's nice, but I'm not really a fan when it has the notebook^ in it and I'm cycling. It gets rather heavy on one shoulder, slides around a touch too much, even with the stabilising strap, and sometimes the main strap slips more onto my neck than my shoulder. The only other complaint is the laptop padding can't be removed without major surgery to the bag. This limits the bag's use when I don't require it to cart my shiny aluminium fruit.

I have heard# that in Brisbane do some really nice cycling specific bags.


* I didn't buy it from this store, but I did pay more than this for it.
^ My computer gets too hot to safely use on my lap, hence why Apple won't call it a 'laptop'.
# from former DHBC member DamienM

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colin
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Postby colin » 20 Feb 2014, 15:25

I recommend a Deuter with the aircomfort back. I have been commuting with one for years and they last (12years for the last one)
The webbed back is great in summer and they have built-in helmet holder and rain cover
I went for the Cross Air 20 EXP which maybe a little small for the notebook but fits my size 11.5's, clothes and lunch easily.

Colin

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mikesbytes
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Postby mikesbytes » 21 Feb 2014, 08:16

I have commuted with laptops for donkey years and only destroyed 2 in the process. One got wet and the other one fell out of my bag when I took my bag off my back.

My policies for carrying a laptop are;
1. the hard drive must have anti shock protection
2. it is only carried on my back, ie no panniers, easier for males I know
3. triple wrap the laptop in quality plastic bags, no exceptions, the beautiful sunshine may not be appearing closer to work

My bag preference for backpack is Kathmandu as you can attached yoga mats to the outside. Check out the waterproof messenger back packs that David Browne uses

Is it a work laptop? Ask them for a second power supply, then you can leave one at work and one at home - less weight to carry :)

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JoTheBuilder
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Postby JoTheBuilder » 21 Feb 2014, 08:28

Why is it easier to carry for males?

Yes, I've been looking for a waterproof bag though most of them come with those wraparound waterproof covers. It also has 6 hour battery life so I don't need to carry a power supply as I don't plan to work for more than 6 hours of an evening at home!

Thanks too Tim and Colin. All very nice looking bags. A couple of shops here in the city stock Deuter so will go for a walk at lunch.

timothy_clifford
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Postby timothy_clifford » 21 Feb 2014, 09:40


jcaley
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Postby jcaley » 21 Feb 2014, 10:42

Ortleib pannier

shrubb face
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Postby shrubb face » 21 Feb 2014, 11:17


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mikesbytes
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Postby mikesbytes » 22 Feb 2014, 06:49

Jo: Males have stronger upper bodies than females. A male upper body strength is 80% of his lower body, where a females upper body strength is 60% of her lower body. Add to the laptop your work clothes, food (I know you are too health conscious to risk purchased food), lunchtime exercise attire and equipment, towel and clean lycra for the return journey and it all adds up. Of course a way around that is to put all that in panniers and just have the laptop in the back pack, then its a non issue.

Timothy: Never had a issue with static

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utopia
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Postby utopia » 22 Feb 2014, 08:07

http://www.carradice.co.uk/index.php?pa ... rl=sqrslim

I don't commute 'regularly' with a laptop but have done it a couple of times.
Last night I had to take back a printout consisting of 87 unfolded A4 pages and had my jeans( casual Friday!), shirt, towel and rain gear in it.
Nothing beats commuting without weight on the shoulders.

Ps: found an old post with some pics of stuffing a laptop in as an experiment.
http://www.sydneycyclist.com/xn/detail/ ... ent:430070
The page after has the pictures of detaching and re-attaching the QR bag.
The bag arrived Christmas 2011 and it is still holding up well.

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Eleri
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Postby Eleri » 22 Feb 2014, 10:18

I've often put my Airmac in its neoprene cover inside my Crumpler Messenger bag. Don't recall having any problems with my breasts :-)

For many years, before they invented light laptops (ie 15+ years ago) I commuted with my very heavy laptop in my pannier.
Nothing bad has ever happened to any of the laptops as a result of commuting.

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anna_g
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Postby anna_g » 22 Feb 2014, 10:55


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jonboy
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Postby jonboy » 22 Feb 2014, 11:02

I'm surprised you even use a laptop. They're so 2010...

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JoTheBuilder
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Postby JoTheBuilder » 24 Feb 2014, 07:35


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mikesbytes
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Postby mikesbytes » 24 Feb 2014, 07:46

LOL

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JoTheBuilder
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Postby JoTheBuilder » 25 Feb 2014, 12:47

Thanks all.

I've ended up with a . It's 30L so a little bit bigger but will allow me to carry any training gear I need or fold up shirts so they don't get too squashed. It is exceptionally light and has a chest and waist strap (to get around those pesky breasts) and is weather resistant.

Its only downfall is it's not red (I got the orange one). But I should survive.

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anna_g
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Postby anna_g » 25 Feb 2014, 18:36


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JoTheBuilder
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Postby JoTheBuilder » 14 Apr 2014, 20:51

So... Update. I'm not particularly happy with the Crumpler. HEAPS of room but no back support. There is no rigidity to the back so all that happens is I get a sore back. I brought up my concerns with them but as I've already used it there is not much anyone can do. I will suffer in silence. :-)

However, I did notice this on Kickstarter. It's probably not big enough for what I need but an inbuilt light is very handy. Can't quite understand why they don't provide it in red as rear lights are predominantly red but it's still pretty cool (and not overly expensive if they go into production):
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/15 ... g?ref=live

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Stuart
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Postby Stuart » 15 Apr 2014, 12:49

The answer lies in N+1 ... get a cheap Chinese Ti frame with rack lugs, wack some wheels and a bitsa groupo on, buy some panniers and use it to commute.

GregPankhurst
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Postby GregPankhurst » 15 Apr 2014, 18:08

Even better answer. Leave the laptop at work, buy a cheap notebook and remote in. Or just use a smartphone

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mikesbytes
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Postby mikesbytes » 15 Apr 2014, 20:34

It's your dads fault for not delivering a Y chromosome

Jokes aside, is the problem actually the bag or how its packed? If it's the bag, then what kinda back support do you need?


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